Search Site

This search form uses an instant search feature. As you type, search results will appear automatically below the search field. When you've entered you desired search terms use tab to navigate through the available results and hit enter to open the selected page or document.
Expectations Not Met
Jojo Montgomery
Friday, February 28, 2020

     Two years ago, “To All the Boys I Loved Before” took Netflix by storm, earning a 97 percent on Rotten Tomatoes and becoming one of the biggest movies on the streaming platform. On Feb. 12, “To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You” did not amount to the first movie.

     In the continuation of the love story of Peter Kavinsky (Noah Centineo) and Lara Jean Covey (Lana Condor), they resume from the ending of the first movie, in a new, fresh relationship and getting used to their high school lives together. But many trials and tribulations come up in the midst of their love story, ranging from Kavinsky’s old relationship with Genevieve (Emilija Baranac) and the appearance of Covey’s middle school crush, John Ambrose McClaren (Jordan Fisher). The whole movie’s plot revolves around how they cope with their new situations and the development of their relationship throughout.

     While the iconic couple, Centineo and Condor, is one that many fans want a romantic relationship out of, their chemistry seemed off in the movie. In “To All the Boys I Loved Before,” the tension was understandable, and it definitely became more natural and adorable as Covey and Kavinsky’s relationship went on. However, in the sequel, the awkwardness is prominent. It is like they do not have a real bond, as friends or as coworkers. Although the talent of their acting is undeniable in most of the movie, it is hard to look over these types of flaws in some of the scenes that are supposed to be romantic and cute. 

     The introduction of John Ambrose McClaren was made to be a bigger deal than it actually was. He was introduced to create tension between the relationship of Kavinsky and Covey. However, he did not seem to cause any huge discourse that he should have. He was a weak contender for Covey’s heart, despite snagging it for a little bit. Furthermore, in the book, he was supposed to be introduced as the grandson of Stormy (Holland Taylor), one of the influential elders in the nursing home that Covey decides to volunteer at. Yet in the movie, he was not introduced that way. Instead, it is a mere coincidence that they decided to be the only two volunteers for Belleview Nursing Home. This made the movie look like it was reaching for something to happen, and it made the plot seen forced and lost its urgency as to why he needed to be back into Covey’s life in the first place.

     Furthermore, the lack of accuracy of the movie to the book is a big downside to the movie. The book’s plot is what made it such a big hit and a no. 1 New York Times Bestseller. However, it can also be used as a plus, as movie-watchers and book readers alike do not know what to expect so their reactions are genuine. The written-in plot is not bad at all. It does not lack any sappiness of a traditional romance movie, and it is also one that invokes intense emotion. However, the directors, actors and actresses definitely could have done better portraying the relationships between characters. 

     Overall, the movie receives 6 out of 10 stars and can be found on the streaming service Netflix.